Diastolic Dysfunction in Patients With HIV, Associations With Cardiac Function

Diastolic dysfunction was associated with multiple alterations in cardiac structure and function in a contemporary HIV-positive population receiving antiretroviral therapy, according to results published in the Journal of Cardiac Failure. A multicenter, cross-sectional, case-control study of people with HIV who were receiving treatment and demonstrated viral suppression was conducted. There were 94 patients with diastolic dysfunction and 101 patients without diastolic dysfunction. All patients had ejection fraction >50%, no significant valvular disease, and no history of coronary revascularization or persistent atrial fibrillation. The groups were similar in CD4 cell count,…

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People with HIV aged 75 and older receiving good HIV care but many at risk of frailty

People with HIV aged 75 years and older are receiving “almost perfectly managed” care, but are more likely to experience age-related health conditions, according to French research published in Médecine et maladies infectieuses.

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French study finds one in six stops PrEP within 12 months, one in three after 30 months

PREVENIR, the French open-label study looking at PrEP use in gay and bisexual men in the Paris region, has found that 16% of study participants either told clinicians they were stopping PrEP or disappeared from the study within a year, and that 32% had discontinued PrEP after 30 months. Younger men (aged 25 and under), people who had never taken PrEP before and men with poorer education were all more likely to discontinue PrEP than other men in the study.

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More than half of people with HIV have an excess heart age of at least ten years

People living with HIV in the United States have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease as expressed by their ‘heart age’, Dr Angela Thompson-Paul and colleagues report in the October issue of AIDS. Using data from the HIV Outpatient Study, an ongoing, prospective cohort study, individual cardiovascular risk factor profiles were used to estimate heart age in people receiving care in HIV clinics in the United States.

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Switching to TAF-based PrEP improves kidney and bone markers – but does it raise cardiovascular risk?

People who switched from Truvada (tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine) to the newer Descovy (tenofovir alafenamide/emtricitabine) for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) experienced improvements in measures of kidney function and bone density, but adverse clinical outcomes were rare with either coformulation, researchers reported at the recent IDWeek 2019 conference in Washington, DC.

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